Allspice Pimento Whole 

Allspice combines the distinct flavours of nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves. It can be used in any recipe as a substitute for cloves where a milder flavour is desired. Allspice is native to Jamaica & Central America. Allspice is used as an ingredient in peppermill mixes, pickling spices, marinades for red meats, marinades for fish, pate/terrines seasonings and in stewed fruit compotes.

 

Uses and Ideas!   © 

  • Add to mixed peppercorns and crush with a mortar and pestle - combine with softened butter - spoon onto cling film and roll to form a cylinder - freeze and slice off small discs to place atop your favourite grilled steaks, lamb cutlets or chicken.
  • Escabeche (ess ka bey chay) - is a Spanish dish of lightly seared fish that is then marinated and pickled for about two hours before serving at room temperature. Use kingfish, snapper, salmon, blue eye cod - place the seared fillets in a shallow dish. In a bowl combine lightly roasted crushed all spice, peppercorns and cumin seeds with lime juice, white wine vinegar, olive oil, oregano, bay leaves and sea salt. Add sautéed sliced onion/garlic. Pour the mix together over the fillets. Allow to marinate for at least two hours.
 Allspice Pimento Ground 

Allspice combines the distinct flavours of nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves. It can be used in any recipe as a substitute for cloves where a milder flavour is desired. Allspice is used in Jamaican Jerk Spice Mix/Rub. Allspice is used in beetroot soup (Borsch) and Middle Eastern dishes such as Lamb Kibbeh and Moroccan Tagines.  Allspice complements the flavours of bananas, mangoes, cherries, plums and pears in dessert recipes.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make a fennel and potato gratin - Sauté sliced onion with allspice - add sliced fennel and sliced peeled potatoes - season well - place in a gratin dish and just cover with a mix of half milk/cream. Slow Bake, top with grated gruyere and place under a griller until golden.
  • Make a Jamaican Salsa to serve with barbecued chicken or fish - sauté garlic with allspice, add finely diced red onion, diced vine ripened tomatoes, diced mango, chilli (to taste), a splash of rum, virgin olive oil and freshly chopped coriander (cilantro) leaves.
  • A pinch of allspice goes well of sautéed spinach leaves, sprinkled on grilled or slow roasted tomatoes, Spanish onions, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, carrots and beetroot.
 Aniseed seeds 

Aniseed has a distinct liquorice flavour and is sweeter than fennel seeds. Aniseed is a flavour component of the beverage Ouzo (Greek) and Pernod (French). Aniseed is used in baked goods such as cakes, biscuits and breads. Aniseed is well suited to light seafood dishes such as shellfish soups, broths and casseroles.  The sweetness of Aniseed also complements the flavours of roast root vegetables and braised cabbage, brussel sprouts etc. Add to vegetable based soups & Indian style vegetable dishes.  

 

 Uses and Ideas!  ©

Combine with sea salt and cracked pepper as a seasoning for roast pork belly, roast pork fillet or grilled pork cutlets. Use aniseed to add sweetness to spice seasonings for rolled veal saddle or stuffing roast chicken.

  • Add aniseed to simple biscuit pastes, slices or shortbread before baking.
  • Make a Mediterranean inspired shellfish soup - sauté onion/garlic in olive oil with aniseeds / bay leaf / oregano. Add diced fennel, tomato, cooked cannellini beans. Add shellfish or chicken stock and simmer for 30 mins. Add sea salt and white pepper to taste before adding pieces of fish and shellfish. Serve in bowls with chopped parsley and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

 

 Baharat Spice Mix Baharat is the Arabic name for “spice mixture” and features in Arabic cuisine predominately in the Gulf States and Northern Africa. Baharat is a fragrant and exotic blend of spices which varies from region throughout the Middle East. Baharat is not a hot spice but has a warming character predominately from the pepper, cumin, cloves and cardamom. It is well suited to whole joints of meat or cutlets, steaks and chicken breasts. Apply Baharat liberally with olive oil to choice of meat– Allow the spice mix to permeate the meat for 30 minutes prior to slow roasting. Baharat adds a fragrant earthiness to braised lamb dishes or rice, lentil, bean or chickpea casseroles and vegetables such as grilled tomatoes or sautéed spinach.

Bay Leaves  

Dried bay leaves are better suited for cooking purposes (than fresh) as they are less bitter. They add a clean & intense earthy flavour to dishes are best suited in slow cooked braised dishes, stocks, soups, stews, casseroles, meat loaves & terrines. Crushed bay leaves impart more fragrance than whole leaves. When using crushed bay leaves tie in muslin cloth so they can be easily removed at the end of the cooking process. Bay Leaves are a key ingredient of Bouquet Garni.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make a simple French onion soup. Caramelise onions and garlic; add bay leaves and thyme leaves, beef or chicken stock, simmer and season. Serve in a bowl with a large crouton made with toasted sour dough or baguette and melted gruyere cheese on top.
  • Confit (slowly braise in olive oil) diced onion, carrot, celeriac, celery, parsnip with bay leaves, rosemary, white peppercorns and sea salt. Serve with seared Salmon, grilled ocean trout, pan seared chicken breast, veal escalopes, rump, sirloin, minute steaks or grilled prawns.  
  • Add to spaghetti bolognaise, meat ragouts, beef bourguignon, “slow cooked” braised dishes & casseroles.
Basil Leaves  

The flavour of dried basil is similar to a combination of allspice, mild clove and mild mint. Dried basil does not exhibit the intense floral fragrance of fresh basil. Dried basil is suited to recipes where long slow cooking is required such as soups, sauces and slow braised dishes.  

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make a simple pizza by topping Lebanese bread with pasta style tomato sauce, grated mozzarella, pepperoni and crumbled goats feta. Drizzle with virgin olive oil, sprinkle with basil leaves and chilli flakes before baking.
  • Add to homemade minestrone, simple broth style soups or pureed soups e.g. basil and sweet corn with oven baked and basil tossed sour dough croutons.
  • Sauté sliced spring onions in olive oil with basil leaves and lardons (bacon) - serve alongside fried eggs, add to omelettes, and fold through scrambled eggs or mashed potato.
  • Sprinkle over halved roma/Italian tomatoes with salt, pepper and olive oil - semi dry in a low temp' oven. Use the tomatoes with salads, antipasto, added to pasta dishes or as accompaniments to grilled meats or poultry.
  • Add to a casserole of tomato, eggplant and garlic - use as a sauce with seafood or chicken, vegetables and pasta.
 Cajun Mix Louisiana 

"Cajun" refers to the rustic cuisine of rural Louisiana that was developed by displaced French Canadians during their expulsion from British rule in the 1750's. Cajun food is characterised by simple French & Mediterranean style, one pot style dishes. Cajun spice combines a link with the old world herbs & spices of oregano, thyme and cumin with the new world spices of paprika, pepper and chilli.

 

Use Cajun Spice as a dry rub (or moisten with oil) on fish, chicken, prawns or steaks. Add to soups, vegetable, lentils or sprinkle over baked potatoes, gratins or grilled tomatoes. Make spiced cashews to serve with drinks. In a bowl mix 500 grams raw unsalted cashews, 1 egg white, half a cup sugar and 3 tablespoons Cajun spice mix. Mix all together and then pour onto a baking tray. Bake in medium over until brown. Cool and then separate mixture - add a little salt to taste. (Great also with almonds!)

 Caraway Seeds 

Caraway has an intense nut like aroma that combines the sweet flavours of anise, aniseed, fennel and mint. It is used in traditional continental style breads such as rye bread and is a key ingredient in barbecue style spice rubs and the fiery Tunisian spice paste, Harissa. 

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Crush the seeds, sauté in olive oil and add to carrots.
  • Combine crushed caraway seeds with sea salt and cracked pepper - use as a dry rub/seasoning for roast pork belly, poultry or grilling steaks.
  • Add to braised cabbage, sautéed leeks or caramelized onions.
  • Add caraway seeds and mint to roast new potatoes
  • Make a fragrant sweet potato dip by adding caraway and chilli to sautéed onion, add to well cooked sweet potato & puree with olive oil, sea salt and white ground pepper. Serve as a dip or reheat and serve with grilled fish, grilled poultry/duck, or steaks. 
  • Create a simple pasta of sautéed Chorizo, onion, caraway seed, and tomato - add pasta and top with fresh chopped herbs.
  • Caraway also adds a unique flavour to baked/stewed fruits such as apples, quinces, pears & pineapple.
 Cardamom Ground 

Cardamom is native to Western India and is intensely fragrant & aromatic. Its warm pungency contributes a "perfume" to curries, rice dishes, vegetable dishes, pickles and syrups. Use sparingly as it can be over powering. Cardamom is also used in Indian & Middle Eastern beverages & breakfast pastries. Cardamom can be used to flavour ice creams, kulfi, fruit compotes such as pineapple, mango, apples, pear and bananas. In Arabian Cuisines Cardamom is one of the most popular spices. Cardamom coffee is a symbol of hospitality and prestige. One and a half teaspoons of ground cardamom is the equivalent of 10 cardamom pods.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Mix a little ground cardamom, ground cumin and parsley into breadcrumbs when crumbing lamb meatballs/cutlets.
  • Score a fresh mango cheek in a trellis pattern - and dust with a mixture of ground cardamom/ brown sugar before flash grilling or torching - serve with vanilla ice cream.
  • Add a pinch of ground cardamom and ground ginger to a stick date pudding recipe for a fragrant spicy variation.
  • Add a little ground cardamom to a vanilla panna cotta, serve with pineapple compote scented with cassia quills.   
Cardamom Pods  

Cardamom is native to Western India and is intensely fragrant & aromatic. Its warm pungency contributes a "perfume" to curries, rice dishes, vegetable dishes, pickles and syrups. Use sparingly as it can be over powering. Cardamom is also used in Indian & Middle Eastern beverages & breakfast pastries. Cardamom can be used to flavour ice creams, kulfi, fruit compotes such as pineapple, mango, apples, pear and bananas. In Arabian Cuisines Cardamom is one of the most popular spices, with Cardamom coffee being a symbol of hospitality and prestige. 10 cardamom pods is the equivalent of one and a half teaspoons of ground.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make a fragrant Indian style chicken dish - remove the seeds from 10 cardamom pods and crush them in pestle and mortar. Mix with fresh garlic, ginger, natural yoghurt, lemon zest, white pepper, ground coriander, and cumin and ground chilli. Make a paste, mix in a bowl with chicken thigh pieces - marinate in the fridge for 6 hours. Heat oil in a pan, sauté onions, chicken, add diced tomato, coconut milk - simmer until cooked (about 25 mins). Add sea salt, curry leaves/coriander - serve with rice.  
 Cayenne Pepper 

Cayenne Pepper is a member of the chilli family. On a scale of 1 to 10 cayenne has an intense heat rating of 8. Use sparingly to add a kick to curries, stir fries or any dish requiring heat. Cayenne pepper is rated hotter than Tabasco sauce. If in doubt when adding to a dish - add less, re-taste and then add more as desired.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make a gazpacho soup - add cayenne for a fiery kick - also add freshly chopped mint to temper some of the heat from the cayenne
  • Add cayenne to meat balls and hamburger patties for added zing before barbequing.
  • Perfect to add zing to a Bloody Mary - Tomato juice, celery stick, vodka, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper and cayenne!
  • Add to a simple scone mix with grated parmesan cheese and chives.
  • Make your own simple hot spice rub by combining sea salt, cayenne, ground caraway and sweet paprika - Use as a sprinkle over home cooked chunky chips or French fries, grilled meats or salt and pepper squid.
  • Add to gumbos, soups, casseroles or any dish requiring a kick.
 Celery Seeds 

Celery Seed is the dried fruit of the plant Apium graveolens, a wild variety of common celery. These small, brownish-green seeds have a flavour similar to celery combined with fennel or anise. Celery seed is particularly useful when you want to add a celery flavour to a cooked dish when the crispy crunch of the actual vegetable is undesired.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make classic bread and butter pickles using celery seed for flavouring. Serve the pickles alongside sandwiches or hamburgers or eat them alone for a deliciously tart snack.
  • Sprinkle ground celery seed on cold-cut sandwiches for an added kick.
  • Add celery seed to any potato salad recipe for a fresh, summery taste.

 

 Chillies Crushed 

Chilli is one of the most commonly used spices in the world. Originally from the "Americas" it is used for adding heat to dishes. On a scale of 1 to 10 crushed chilli has a heat rating of 7(seven). Sweet dishes can also benefit from a chilli kick - place thick slices of mango or pineapple on a grill or barbecue, and sprinkle with a little brown sugar and crushed chilli.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make a simple pasta dish of Linguini with Chilli and Prawns - Cook linguini in boiling salted water until al dente - then drain. Add peeled prawns (tail on) to a hot pan with olive oil, chopped garlic, oregano or Italian Herbs and crushed chilli (to taste) - sauté until just cooked - toss in some lemon zest and spinach leaves - add the pasta - add salt and pepper to taste.
  • Sprinkle crushed chilli over homemade pizza with oregano, sliced button mushrooms, pepperoni, anchovies - and drizzle of olive oil.
  • Make a red pepper and chilli jam - sauté crushed chillies, cumin seeds, mustard seeds (yellow and brown), chopped garlic, and diced red onion, red capsicum and tomatoes in a heavy based pot. Add palm sugar and fish sauce - slow simmer until a jam like consistency.  
Chillies Ground

 

 

Chilli is one of the most commonly used spices in the world. It is used for adding heat to dishes. On a scale of 1 to 10 ground chilli has a heat rating of 7 (seven). Chillies (crushed or ground) are added to curry pastes, fragrant spice pastes, marinades, pickles, chutneys, salsa and sauces. When adding chilli to recipes, add less rather than more (as more can always be added to taste).

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make a chilli, soy and ginger dressing by combining finely chopped spring onion and ginger with ground chilli, sesame oil, peanut oil, dark soy sauce and palm sugar. Serve with salad leaves and grilled seafood.
  • Add ground chilli to guacamole, homemade tomato sauces, Spanish style rice dishes or Mexican style black beans
  • Combine ground chilli with ground cumin and dust over hot buttered corn with freshly chopped coriander (cilantro).
  • Add extra ground chilli to your favourite spice mixes if you like extra heat and zing to your dishes. Use with chicken wings, hamburgers, grilled meats, poultry and seafood.
  • Dust over corn chips with melted cheddar, spiced mince and chives.
 Chillies Whole 

Chilli is one of the most commonly used spices in the world. Whole chillies should be soaked in boiling water for about 15 minutes to soften before using. Chilli has an affinity with chocolate dating back to the Aztecs and Mayans of Central America. It is regarded the Mayans concocted a frothy hot chocolate flavoured with chilli and vanilla. In small amounts the heat of the chilli helps cut through the richness of dark chocolate. On a scale of 1 to 10 ground chilli has a heat rating of 7 (seven).

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Add pre-soaked and drained chillies to Asian style stir-fries. The chillies will impart their heat to the dish and don’t need to be served/eaten with finished dish.
  • Add to stir-fried mussels or clams with the addition of ginger, spring onions, garlic, shao hsing wine, oyster sauce, sesame oil, a touch of sugar, diced red capsicum and baby corn - Toss through basil leaves or coriander sprigs at the last moment.
  • Make a smoked chilli dressing - combine pre-soaked chillies, smoked  Paprika, garlic, fish sauce, sugar, olive oil and lemon zest in a blender
  

 

Chinese Five Spice  Chinese Five Spice Mix is a balanced blend of cooling & warming spices & thus represents "yin & yang" that is fundamental to Chinese cuisine & philosophy. Use as dry spice rub or marinade for chicken, pork & duck. Add sea salt to the spice mix and sprinkle over deep fried whitebait, calamari/squid or quails. Use as a fragrant spice seasoning for salmon fillets (or oily fish). Five spice can be added to stir fried vegetables with sea salt and a little sesame oil. Add five spice to marinades for pork ribs or chicken wings. Add a pinch of five spice to a sesame oil vinaigrette to toss with Chinese cabbage salad. Add Five Spice and grated orange zest to cookie or muffin mixes.
 Chipotle Powder - Smoked Jalapeno 

Spice & Co. Chipotle is sourced from Spain and is a naturally smoked product with an earthy sweet taste. Chipotle is made by drying ripened Jalopeno Chilli peppers (capsicum) in smoke houses fuelled with slow burning oak wood. The smoke enhances the flavour by caramelizing the naturally present sugars. The chilli peppers are milled to a fine powder and used to add colour/flavour to dishes. Chefs tip - as with saffron, a little goes a long way and can easily dominate a dish so less is more!

 

- Make a Chipotle Mayonnaise by sauteing shallots with Chipotle Powder in olive oil and combining (when chilled) with quality mayonnaise - drizzle over seafood or chicken tacos or salads. - Add Chipotle Powder to Spanish paellas, Mediterranean style seafood/tomato soups and braised meat dishes. - Add Chipotle Powder to marinades or combine with sweet paprika and dust over baked/sauteed potatoes. - Chipotle gives a great flavour to red meat spice rubs or marinades.

- Chipotle adds an earthy dimension to braised lentils, Italian peperonata and pasta sauces. It goes well with poultry, beef/pork ribs, caramelised onions and roast root vegetables.

 Cinnamon Cassia Quills 

(Cinnamon) Cassia Quills are from the same family of trees as cinnamon quill (sticks). Cassia Quills are the dried bark of the cassia tree - the bark tending to "scroll" inwards as it dries rather than "curling” as is the case with cinnamon quill (sticks). Cassia quills are more pungent and robust in flavour than cinnamon (sticks). They are darker in colour than cinnamon quill (sticks) and they have an intense deep woody/earthy flavour. Cassia Quills are well suited to long slow cooking such as Chinese/Vietnamese braised meat/poultry dishes, Indian curries and rice dishes. Quills can be added to recipes where an earthier rather than sweeter flavour is desired.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Add to Chinese "red" braised dishes with chicken/duck.
  • Add to Asian style broths/soups/stocks (master stock).
  • Add to sugar syrups with star anise, orange/mandarin peel and red or white wine when poaching pears, quinces, pineapple, rhubarb or red fleshed stone fruits.
  • Add to "mulling" spices to warm/infuse with red wine.
  • Make a variation on Teriyaki sauce - simmer pieces of cassia quill with soy sauce, mirin, sake, sugar to taste and grated orange zest, serve with grilled chicken or fish.
 Cinnamon Ground 

Cinnamon is a sweet woody flavoured and intensely perfumed spice. Cinnamon is a key ingredient of (Chinese) five spice powder and (Indian) garam masala. It is one of the most widely used spices in the world. Cinnamon is most often associated with baking and dessert recipes (cakes, biscuits, fruit dishes and sweet cream based desserts) but is often used to add a fragrant earthy flavour to savoury dishes. Its woody sweetness and aroma makes it a favoured spice in Middle Eastern dishes.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make Cinnamon sugar - add 1 part ground cinnamon to 4 parts castor sugar - sprinkle over sliced apple, pears, plums, peaches, pineapple or grapefruit before caramelising under a grill. "Dust" the cinnamon sugar over French toast, beignets or banana fritters.
  • Add to steamed chocolate or vanilla pudding recipes, pancake mix, chocolate fudge brownies, chocolate cake, or hot chocolate sauce spiked with coffee liqueur.
  • Dust over breakfast yoghurt and hot oat based cereals.
  • Add a hint to ham glazes, or a pinch to roast sweet potatoes, baby Dutch carrots, beetroots or sweet potato.
  • Rub into a crumble mix to top apple/rhubarb crumble.
 Cinnamon Sticks 

Cinnamon "Sticks" are from the same family of trees as cinnamon cassia quills. Cinnamon "Sticks" are the dried bark of the an evergreen tree - the bark curling inwards like a thin cigar (as it dries) rather than "scrolling"  as with cinnamon cassia quills. Cinnamon Sticks have a more fragrant, floral aroma and are less pungent than cassia quills. Cinnamon Sticks are lighter in colour and more fragile than cassia quills. Both Cassia and Cinnamon Sticks are generally interchangeable in recipes - depending on your preference. 

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Add to cream based preparations for ice-creams, semi-freddo, pana cotta, parfaits or cream brulee.
  • Add with star anise to a Vietnamese beef pho (soup).
  • Take a break from coffee or tea?  Warm apple cider in a non-reactive pan - add one cinnamon stick and two allspice pimento berries. Gently heat until simmering, remove the allspice berries and pour the cider into mugs. Use the cinnamon sticks to garnish each mug.
  • Add to Indian style vegetable dishes, rice pilaffs, biriyani.
  • Add a cinnamon stick and split vanilla bean to poached stone fruits or sautéed diced apples to serve with pork.
 Cloves Whole 

Cloves are unopened tropical flower buds. They originated in Indonesia and are one of the most pungent spices. This highly aromatic spice has an intense flavour and should be used sparingly. Cloves should be used to impart flavour during the cooking process, but removed from dishes prior to serving as they retain their hard woody texture. They are key ingredient in (Indian) garam masala and (Chinese) five spice. Are added to curries, casseroles and béchamel (a white sauce simmered with a clove studded bay leaf and onion). Cloves go well with apples (apple pie), pickles and spiced (mulled) wines. Cloves are traditionally used to stud baked ham and are associated with festive baking.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Braised Red Cabbage - Braise 1 finely sliced red cabbage in olive oil with 2 finely sliced Spanish onion, 2 grated apples, 6 cloves, 1 pinch of mace, 1 tbsp of red currant jelly and 1 tbsp of red wine vinegar. Add 1 tbsp of butter and slow braise for 80 minutes (stir occasionally). Season to taste and serve with roast duck, pork, game or quail. Omit the butter and serve chilled with pastrami on rye bread. Remember to remove cloves before serving!
 Cloves Ground - New 

Cloves are unopened tropical flower buds. They originated in Indonesia and are one of the most pungent spices. This highly aromatic spice has an intense flavour and should be used sparingly. Cloves should be used to impart flavour during the cooking process, but removed from dishes prior to serving as they retain their hard woody texture. They are key ingredient in (Indian) garam masala and (Chinese) five spice. Are added to curries, casseroles and béchamel (a white sauce simmered with a clove studded bay leaf and onion). Cloves go well with apples (apple pie), pickles and spiced (mulled) wines. Whole Cloves are traditionally used to stud baked ham and ground cloves are associated with festive baking.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Braised Red Cabbage - Braise 1 finely sliced red cabbage in olive oil with 2 finely sliced Spanish onion, 2 grated apples, 1 t ground cloves, 1 pinch of nutmeg ground, 1 tbsp of red currant jelly and 1 tbsp of red wine vinegar. Add 1 tbsp of butter and slow braise for 80 minutes (stir occasionally). Season to taste and serve with roast duck, pork, game or quail. Omit the butter and serve chilled with pastrami on rye bread.
  • Make a spiced shortbread adding 1/2 t each ground cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves to your favourite sweet shortbread recipe
Coriander Ground  

Coriander is native to Egypt and the southern Mediterranean and has a fragrant lemon/orange scented flavour with traces of mild pepper. It is a mild amalgamating spice and therefore forms the basis of many spice mixtures such as curry powders and the Indian masalas Sambhar, Rasam, Garam etc. It is used to add flavour to dahls, braised lentils, chickpeas and vegetable dishes.  

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make a simple and quick Harissa Paste - Harissa is a fiery hot Tunisian chilli based spice paste used as a condiment or wet rub with barbecued meats. Use this recipe as a guideline only, so that you control the heat!   Combine 3 tbsp dried chilli flakes with 1 clove fresh garlic (1 tsp dried), 1 tbsp ground caraway seeds (or toasted/crushed seeds), 1 tbsp ground coriander, 1 tbsp of sweet paprika, 1 tsp smoked paprika, 1 tsp dried mint, sea salt to taste and enough olive oil to form a "moist" paste. Chefs' Tips - Warm the spices first to maximise flavour. If you find the paste too hot, add 1 roast/peeled red capsicum and blend until smooth. Serve Harissa with grilled meats/poultry, cold cuts platters, roast vegetables or add to braised meat dishes to give it a kick along
 Coriander Seeds 

Coriander is native to Egypt and the southern Mediterranean and has a fragrant orange scented flavour with traces of mild pepper. Coriander is mild compared with many other spices and therefore forms the basis of many curry powders, masalas and other spice mixes. Coriander seeds are used to flavour cured olives, and as a pickling spice for pearl onions and dill cucumbers.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Add toasted, crushed coriander seeds to citrus based marinades, spice rubs, vinaigrettes or dressings.
  • Coriander adds a warm spice flavour to roast meats, braised lentils, braised chickpeas and tomato/eggplant stews. Roast some parsnips or carrots with a mix of toasted crushed cumin seeds and coriander seeds.
  • Make a simple coconut raita by toasting 2 tbsp of coriander seeds and 2 tbsp of cumin seeds. Cool and grind in a pestle and mortar. Place 400 ml plain yoghurt in a bowl with 1 cup of fresh (or desiccated) coconut with 2 tbsp lime juice and salt to taste. Mix well and place in a serving bowl. Dust the top of the yoghurt mix with the coriander and cumin mix - serve as an accompaniment to Indian style curries.
 Cumin Ground 

Cumin is native to Egypt and is an intensely warm aromatic and balanced sweet spice. The aroma of cumin is enhanced if it is dry roasted briefly before use. Cumin is widely used in spice mixes such as Cajun, Baharat, Panch Phora, Dukkah, curry powders and masalas. Ground cumin can be added to salt and used as a versatile seasoning for meats, poultry and white fish as well as tomatoes and vegetables e.g. eggplant, pumpkin, sweet potato, onions, corn, and carrots.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Saute finely diced onion in butter or olive oil, add a pinch of cumin and/or dried mint, then toss with freshly cooked peas, beans, okra or brussel sprouts.
  • Add cumin to olive oil, use the oil for to brush sliced eggplant, vegetable kebabs or grilled sourdough at barbecues. Use the oil to sauté cherry tomatoes or prawns before tossing with pasta/noodles with oregano.
  • Add cumin to braised lentils or cous cous or potatoes.
  • Mix ground cumin with flour, salt/pepper and use to coat blanched chicken drumettes before deep frying.
  • Warm ground cumin in a pan and add to hummus.
 Cumin Seeds 

Cumin is native to Egypt and is an intensely warm aromatic and balanced sweet spice. The aroma of cumin is enhanced if it is dry roasted briefly before use. Cumin is widely used in spice mixes such as Cajun, Baharat, Panch Phora, Dukkah, curry powders and masalas.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Lightly toasted cumin seeds add great flavour to simple leaf salads, roast root vegetables or baked potatoes. 
  • Add to Tex-Mex dishes like chilli con carne or Mexican rice, fajitas, black beans soups or braised pinto beans.
  • Add to brown lentil soup with tomato and eggplant.
  • Add cumin to braised chickpeas with diced red capsicum
  • Place toasted cumin seeds in marinades for beef ribs, pork ribs or butterflied shoulders or legs of lamb.
  • Bruise toasted cumin seeds in a pestle and mortar and rub with rosemary, pepper and sea salt over lamb kebabs.
  • Add cumin to fresh tomato sauces. Combine warmed cumin seeds w' diced onion, chopped garlic and olive oil. Add punnet of crushed cherry tomatoes, 1 tsp tomato paste and pinch of sugar. Simmer for 3-5 minutes; serve with pasta/chicken/fish.
 Curry Korma Spice Mix 

Kormas are a range of Persian/Mughlai influenced curry dishes of Northern India. Spice & Co. Korma has a mild heat - extra chilli can be added to taste. For Lamb/Chicken Korma sauté 1 diced onion, add 3 tbsp Korma mix for each 500 gms of meat. Brown the meat with the onions/spices. Add 2 tbsp ground cashews or almonds, 1 pinch saffron, 180 ml water, 150 ml natural yoghurt. Slow simmer in a pot until tender. Add a dash of cream to finish (optional), handful fresh or dried curry leaves or fresh coriander leaves. If desired replace the chicken with a vegetable such as cauliflower.

 

Korma spice mix can also be used moistened with oil and used as a wet spice rub on Chicken, Lamb, Steaks, Fish and Prawns etc for a great BBQ or grill dish.

 

 Curry Madras Spice Mix The word "Curry" is an anglicised translation of the Tamil word Kari (meaning spiced sauce or gravy). Generic curry powders are a creation of Western and some Asian cultures as a "pure convenience food" for creating a range of consistently spiced dishes. Madras (Chennai) is in Southern Coastal India and relative to the climate, Madras curries are made with coconut milk, curry leaves and chilli. Spice & Co. Madras curry mix has a medium heat level of chilli. To make a Madras curry - moisten chicken/lamb in buttermilk (to tenderise). Saute onions/garlic, add 3 tbsp madras curry mix per 500 grams meat, add to onions, sauté, and add diced tomatoes (and more chilli if desired). Add 200 ml water and 240 ml coconut cream, slow simmer until tender. Add curry leaves at the end, salt to taste and garnish with coriander leaves.  
 Dill Leaf Tips 

Dill leaves (tips) are native to Eastern Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean. The leaves have a delicate flavour of aniseed and lemon - hence dill is often paired with seafood dishes and sauces. Dill leaves are used in Scandinavian Dishes for flavouring cured salmon (gravlax) traditionally served with a mustard and dill sauce. Dill is added to stuffed vine leaves in Greece, to cabbage and cauliflower dishes in Central Europe, and the dill pickled cucumbers of New York.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Add to scrambled eggs to serve with smoked salmon.
  • Make a lemon vinaigrette, add chopped capers, anchovies and dill and spoon over just cooked seafood.
  • Make a potato salad - whilst potatoes are still warm, add chopped onions (sautéed), mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, sea salt, freshly ground black pepper and dill.
  • Add dill to sour cream or natural yoghurt, spoon over a fresh salad of cucumbers or sliced vine-ripened tomatoes or serve as a dip with water crackers.
  • Add dill to sautéed potatoes, lentil or rice dishes.
 Dukkah Egyptian Nut Mix Dukkah is a nut, seed & spice mixture of Egyptian origin. Spice & Co. Dukkah combines toasted almonds, sesame seeds & spices. Dukkah is traditionally served as a snack or at breakfast. As a snack (or with drinks) - serve the Dukkah in a small bowl alongside a small dish of extra virgin olive oil and bite sized pieces of grilled Turkish bread or sour dough. Dip bread in the oil, then coat in a thin layer of Dukkah, then enjoy!  Sprinkle Dukkah with a little sea salt & extra virgin olive oil over hard or semi boiled eggs (quartered). "Dust'' Dukkah over cheese melts or oven dried tomatoes. Place a spoon of fork mashed avocado on grilled sour dough toast and sprinkle with Dukkah. Add Dukkah to fresh breadcrumbs and use to crumb chicken breasts, fish fillets, lamb cutlets or button mushrooms. Or sprinkle on top your of your favourite dip e.g. Baba Ganoush/ Hummus. Make healthy crackers with flat bread, brush with olive oil and sprinkle with Dukkah- bake and break into pieces to serve with dips, meats and cheeses.
 Fennel Seeds  

Fennel seeds are native to the Mediterranean and have a fragrant aniseed flavour. Fennel seeds go well with roast pork, chicken and seafood dishes (particularly seafood soups). Fennel seeds are the key spice in Italian salamis and sausages, the Indian spice mix Panch Phora, Malaysian Satay spice mix. Fennel seeds are a good digestive aid and (chewed raw) assist in freshening the breath. 

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Toast and crush fennel seeds and sprinkle over feta cheese with freshly ground black pepper and virgin olive oil - serve with sour dough.
  • Add roast fennel seeds to homemade pickled vegetables.
  • Use fennel seeds to flavour any cut of pork (roast or grill).
  • Add to Mediterranean seafood soups or stews.
  • Add fennel seeds to braised chickpeas with fresh chunks of fennel, diced tomatoes and Kalamata olives with garlic, olive oil, Italian parsley, pepper and sea salt. Serve as an accompaniment to roast pork, grilled fish fillets or simply with warmed sourdough baguette.
  • Simple side dish - Sautee in olive oil, fennel seeds, a finely sliced fennel bulb and finely sliced onions.
 Fenugreek Seeds 

Fenugreek Seeds have a mild caramel and malty aroma. They have a slightly bitter flavour when cooked. Their subtle taste finds them used extensively in Indian curries but also in savoury sauces and vegetable dishes throughout India. In addition to curries, fenugreek enhances meats, poultry and vegetables. It is used in the spice blend Panch Phora and is frequently used in pickles and chutneys. Used and cultivated throughout the Mediterranean, India and Northern Africa. The seeds can be sprouted and used in salads.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • To make the Indian Spice mix Panch Phora - combine 4 tbsp brown mustard seeds, 3 tbsp nigella seeds, 3 tbsp cumin seeds, 2 tbsp fenugreek seeds and 2 tbsp fennel seeds.
  • Make spiced potatoes by frying "tempering" the spices in a little olive oil for 1 minute. Strain the oil and reserve the spices. Use the oil to sauté or oven bake diced potatoes, Add the fried spices towards the end of the cooking and toss through fresh chopped coriander - add sea salt and serve. Try the above idea with eggplant or diced fennel bulbs.
 Garam Masala Spice Mix 

Garam Masala literally translates (from Indian) to "mixture of spices". Every Indian household has their own preferred blend of mixed spices. Garam masala is used to add a fragrant spice flavour to curries, soups, basmati rice dishes (lamb biryani), savoury preparations (samosa fillings) & braised dishes e.g. butter chicken. Use Garam Masala on lamb kebabs, meatballs, serve with cucumber yoghurt (raita) or add to sautéed spinach, dry fried cauliflower or eggplant curry. Garam Masala can be used as a dry rub (or moistened with oil) on meats & chicken.

 Garlic Granules 

Garlic granules are made from fresh garlic that has been dehydrated. It has an intense aroma due to the concentration of flavour. Garlic can be used in soups, sauces, marinades and dressings. It can also be added to braised meat dishes, stews and casseroles. Garlic can be used to flavour butter for classic dishes like garlic prawns.  

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make an easy garlic butter by combining softened butter, chopped parsley, garlic lemon juice and zest. Roll into a cylinder shape in cling film and freeze. Cut of small discs as required to serve over grilled steaks etc. 
  • Prepare a Thai style stir-fry of mussels with garlic, ginger and lemongrass. Fry garlic, chopped ginger, chopped lemongrass, whole dried chilli, chopped coriander stalks and lime leaves in a wok with a little oil. Add cleaned mussels with a little chicken stock and quick fry until the mussels just open. Remove the mussels to a bowl and keep warm - add coconut milk to the wok and reduce over high heat to form a sauce. Adjust the seasoning with sea salt and ground white pepper. Toss in fresh coriander - serve over the mussels.
 Ginger Ground 

Ground ginger is a forceful warming ingredient with flavours reminiscent of pepper, mustard and lemon. It is less fragrant than fresh ginger but is penetrating when used in cooking. Ground ginger is popularly used in baking e.g. gingerbread and is the flavour of ginger beer.  Ground ginger is a key ingredient of the spice mixes - Chinese five spice, Ethiopian/Eritrean berbere, Moroccan ''ras el hanout'', Indian curry blends/masalas and the French ''quatre epices''.  Ground ginger can be used in marinades or as a dry rub (with ground cumin)on meats as it has tenderising properties as well as great flavour. 

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Add ground ginger to steamed pudding recipes and serve with sticky glazed quinces and double cream.
  • Mix ground ginger with castor sugar and a little ground cinnamon - dust the sugar over fresh pineapple slices, figs or quartered pears before grilling until caramelized.
  • Toast pine nuts in a pan with a pinch of ground ginger until golden - serve over salads or roast root vegetables.
  • Ground ginger can be added to simple shortbread recipes as well as sweet or savoury pastry dough’s.

 

Greek Herbs & Spice Mix  Greek Herb & Spice Mix blends the sweet, savoury & tart flavours of Greece. It adds great flavour to ground lamb Moussaka or Pastitsi. Dust over sliced eggplant before barbequing. Use the spice mix as a dry rub (or moisten with olive oil) for lamb or chicken souvlakia (kebabs). Use as a seasoning for chicken breasts, lamb cutlets, grilled octopus or prawns. Add a little Greek Herb & Spice Mix to - Kalamata olives, slices of lemon and olive oil and allow the flavours to infuse overnight. Add the spice mix to stewed beef (stifados) or beef/lamb rissoles (keftedes). Use the spice mix on vegetable skewers or whole roast suckling pig, pork ribs/fillet/chops or fish fillets, prawns or scallops.
 Italian Herb & Spice Mix Spice & Co. Italian Herb & Spice Mix is "pure convenience" for packing Italian flavours into all your Mediterranean inspired dishes. Toss the spice mix through your favourite long noodle pasta e.g. linguini, spaghettini, fettuccini etc with toasted pine nuts and extra virgin olive oil or nut brown butter. Use the mix to season butterflied legs/ shoulders of lamb, butterflied chicken or whole fish before roasting/grilling or BBQ. Add the Italian herbs to meat preparations for rissoles and Italian style hamburgers. Combine the mixture with fresh breadcrumbs and coat chicken pieces, breast fillets or white fish fillets. Add to broth style soups, braised white beans or use when making classic garlic bread. Sprinkle on top of homemade pizza for a great taste.
 Juniper Berries

 Juniper Berries are most famously associated with the alcoholic beverage gin. The flavour is reminiscent of the forest and has a clean almost neutral but woody taste. Juniper berries are an effective counter to fatty foods like Pork and Duck. Juniper goes particularly well with venison and game. For this reason Juniper berries are often found in recipes for pates and terrines. Juniper berries are also use to flavour sauces that accompany rich meat & game dishes.

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Add to cabbage when braising as per "Sauerkraut"
  • Make a juniper and red wine marinade to enhance the flavour and tenderize, chicken and game birds (pheasant, quail, guinea fowl etc) - Crush 12 juniper berries, 12 black peppercorns, add 300 ml red wine, 30 mls gin and 30 mls olive oil. Add snipped rosemary to marinade. Marinate duck/game - 3 hours (in the fridge) before cooking.
  • Make juniper ice cubes for visual appeal with Gin and Tonics - Half fill an ice cube tray with water, pop in the berries (they will float) and freeze, top up with more water to surround the juniper berries and re-freeze.   
 Mace 

Mace comes from the same plant as nutmeg. It comes from the outer area of the nutmeg attached to the husk. Mace has a milder flavour than nutmeg and is well matched to slow cooked vegetables such as roast sweet potato, pumpkin and carrots. It is also often added to slow cooked meat dishes, sauces and seafood dishes.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Serve freshly cooked pasta (fettucini, parpadelle etc) with toasted pine nuts, softened feta or goat’s cheese, nut brown butter, chopped herbs and ground mace.  
  • Make an Italian Spice Mixture and use as a dry rub on chicken pieces, pork chops, fish fillets or butterflied shoulders of lamb. Mix 6 tbsp of black peppercorns, 1 tbsp juniper berries, 1 tspn allspice and 1 tsp grated mace. Toast the spices, cool, grind to a coarse powder.
  • Sprinkle mace over homemade mashed potatoes or pumpkin mash using half olive oil / half butter.

 

Marjoram Leaves  

Marjoram is native to the Mediterranean and Western Asia. It is similar in appearance to oregano but is milder and sweeter in flavour. Marjoram is ideal for use in stuffing’s for chicken, pork or veal and enhances egg dishes like frittatas, flans and quiches. Marjoram also adds a delicate flavour to sautéed mushrooms.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Add marjoram to meatballs or meat sauce for spaghetti Bolognese, mushroom ragus or homemade lasagna.
  • Add marjoram to the egg mix when making a Spanish style omelette (pancake shaped) - top with stewed capsicum, tomato and onion and stud with olives, capers and softened feta before finishing under a hot grill.
  • Add marjoram to orange glazed carrots or beetroot - just add a little orange zest and orange juice (reduce to a syrup) at the final stage sautéing in a pan with the veg.
  • Sprinkle marjoram over soft curd cheeses like ashed goats, sheep milk feta, bocconcini, haloumi or buffalo mozzarella - drizzle with extra virgin olive oil, allow to marinate and serve alongside antipasto style dishes.   
  • Crush Marjoram leaves with salt and use as a mild seasoning for chicken, pork or vegetable/side dishes.
Mexican Spice Mix 

Our Mexican mix combines the rich pre-Columbian culinary flavours of Mexicaowith the "New world" spices introduced by Spanish expeditions in the 1600's. Chilli and chipotle (smoked jalapeno) combine with cumin, coriander, cinnamon, ioregano and pepper to create a vibrant blend with medium heat that adds flavour to all your Mixican inspired dishes.

 

Use as a dry rub(moisten items with olive oil) on chicken beef lamb, prawns or fish fillets. Combine mexican mix with flour in a bag and coatchicken wings or calamari prior to frying. Add to minced beef and use with nachos, tacos quesadillas, chilli con carne, burriotos of as a topping for Mexican inspired pizza. Dust mix over buttered corn cobs and BBQ or add to foil baked potatoes and top with fresh coriander.

Mint Leaves 

Mint is native to southern Europe and is one of the most popular herbs used globally. Mint is broadly categorized as either peppermint or spearmint with dried mint being predominantly spearmint. Dried mint is intense in flavour and has a refreshing sweet taste. The concentrated flavour of dried mint is often preferred to fresh mint in dishes like Greek Keftedes (meatballs), stuffed vine leaves etc. Dried mint imparts a great taste to Labna (natural yoghurt thickened by draining off some of the liquid through cheese cloth - whilst refrigerated).

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Add dried mint to fresh breadcrumbs before crumbing flattened lamb cutlets or chicken breast pieces.
  • Make homemade mint sauce by combining dried mint with sugar dissolved in simmered cider or malt vinegar.
  • Add mint to dressings/vinaigrettes for use with salad leaves, vegetable salads or sliced tomatoes.
  • Dried mint goes well with peas, beans, potatoes, zucchini, lamb, shellfish, tomatoes and cucumber.
  • Add mint and cumin to yoghurt, mix and garnish with sumac and virgin oil - serve with grissini/crudités.
 Mixed Herbs 

Mixed Herbs have traditionally been the "convenience" food of the dried herb world. Mixed herbs are a simple, balanced mixture of dried herbs that can be added to minced (ground) meats for use in hamburgers, meatballs, meatloaves, ragus, casseroles, meat sauces (bolognaise), stews and sauces. Mixed herbs can be used as a base for creating your own home blend with the addition of mint, parsley or rosemary.   

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Use mixed herbs when making French onion soup and sprinkle a few extra herbs on the cheese croutons.
  • Add to stuffing’s/seasonings for whole roast chicken.
  • Rub mixed herbs into butterflied legs/shoulders of lamb with smashed garlic cloves, sliced lemon, sea salt, black pepper and olive oil before barbecuing over hot coals.
  • Add mixed herbs to scone and bread dough's or sprinkled over olive oil glazed foccacia and pizza crusts.
  • Add mixed herbs to tomato based pasta sauces.
  • Mixed herbs go well with potato gratins, sautéed new potatoes or "dusted" with chilli over fried potato wedges.
Mixed Spice  Mixed spice is English in origin and is also known as a baking spice and pudding spice. It used in baked/steamed puddings, mincemeat pies, fruit cakes, shortbreads, pastries and biscuits. Mixed spice can be used as a variation instead of pure cinnamon when stewing apples for compotes, apple pies or flans. Add mixed spice to an equal amount of sugar, spoon over halved plums, peaches or figs glaze under a grill and serve with vanilla bean ice-cream or cream. Add mixed spice to frangipane filled sweet tarts studded with apricots and flaked almonds.
Moroccan Spice Mix "ras al hanout" 

Moroccan - "Ras al hanout" - translates to "head of the shop" or best quality spices. The original translation ras (head) hanout (undertaker) suggests some traditional recipes gave such a chilli kick to the head that you would end up at the undertaker!  It is used throughout Morocco in tagines, kebabs, cous cous & pastilla.

 

Use as a dry spice rub (or moisten with oil) on lamb cutlets, chicken wings/drumsticks, steaks, ribs, fish fillets, prawns or scallops. Use for roast whole chicken, lamb rumps/legs, beef rib-eye, strip loin etc. Use for as a base (combined with an onions and garlic sauté) for slow braised lamb shanks, lentils, chicken tagines, braised root vegetables or vegetable soups.

 Mustard Ground 

Powdered mustard is simply finely ground mustard seed. Mustard is widely known for its sharp flavour. This characteristic flavour is an essential component of many dressings and sauces world-wide. Unlike other "hot" flavours, the flavour profile of mustard does not linger. Rather it presents itself quickly, dissipates, and leaves little or no after-taste.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Ground Mustard can be used to make fresh table mustard. Mustard powder should be first added to cold water and allowed to sit for 10-15 minutes. Herb Vinegar, olive oil and other flavours such as Tarragon, Marjoram or 0regano can then be added.
  • Freshly prepared mustard can be mixed with ground Cumin, Paprika, Smoked paprika, Black Mustard Seeds & Black Pepper to make a great flavoured paste to rub over joints of Beef, Lamb, Pork or Chicken prior to roasting.
  • Mix fresh ground mustard with pureed apricots or diluted apricot jam to make a glaze for Baked Ham.
 Mustard Seeds Brown 

Mustard seeds are native to Southern Europe and Western Asia. Brown seeds are slightly more pungent than yellow seeds and are generally used in Indian dishes e.g. curries, Dahl’s. Yellow mustard seeds are generally used in pickling spice mixes and marinades. Mustard seeds have virtually no aroma. Characteristic mustard "heat" is released only when the enzyme myrosinase is activated in the presence of (cold) water. However, frying in oil or dry roasting seeds does not activate myrosinase (heat) resulting in an aromatic flavour. For this reason many curries display the nuttiness of mustard without the intense heat. Brown Mustard seeds are one of the five ingredients of Indian Panch Phora. 

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Soak mustard seeds in cold water, mix with Dijon mustard, parsley & fresh breadcrumbs. Press onto lamb racks before roasting.
  • Prepare a mustard and tarragon butter - combine soft butter with Dijon mustard, soaked mustard seeds and chopped tarragon. Spoon onto cling film and roll into a cylinder. Keep in the freezer and slice a butter disc to top grilled foods or toss through vegetables dishes.
 Mustard Seeds Yellow 

Mustard seeds are native to Southern Europe and Western Asia. Yellow mustard seeds are generally used in pickling spice mixes and marinades. Yellow mustard seeds also assist in flavouring and emulsifying salad dressings. Mustard seeds have virtually no aroma. Characteristic mustard "heat" is released only when the enzyme myrosinase is activated in the presence of (cold) water. However, frying in oil or dry roasting seeds does not activate myrosinase (heat) resulting in an aromatic flavour. For this reason many curries display the nuttiness of mustard without the intense heat. Brown seeds are slightly more pungent than yellow seeds and are generally used in Indian dishes e.g. curries, Dahl’s.

 

Uses and Ideas!  ©

  • Make a warm mustard/ bacon dressing. Serve with grilled chicken, steamed white fish or vegetable. Place 1 tbsp soaked mustard seeds in a bowl with 1 tbsp Dijon mustard. Mix in 3 tbsp white wine vinegar, 1 tbsp water, 1 tbsp lemon juice, whisk in 60 ml olive oil. Add (sautéed) diced shallot and bacon just before serving with chopped chives.